SeaofSkills e-learning platform

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Welcome to the SeaofSkills interactive e-learning platform!

You can select courses from three curriculae:

In addition, you can find resources with respect to:

Course selection instructions

In order to select a course, you must register. Please be so kind as to contact us with your request, and your login credentials will me mailed to your inbox.

Origin of participants – the markers on the map indicate the countries of e-learners that have accessed this platform:

 

Be sure to check out the SeaofSkills calendar for events near you:

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SeaofSkills e-learning interactive assessment platform

After competion of a course, you can access the SeaofSkills e-learning interactive assessment platform.

 

Certificate of Completion

When you complete the course, please be so kind as to contact SeaofSkills so that your Certificate of Completion can be emailed to you.

certificate

 

SeaofSkills e-learning platform assessment

You are welcome to assess the SeaofSkills e-learning platform, through the following questionnaire:

https://goo.gl/forms/xArO5qXFhN3jyFME2

 

INTRODUCTION

This report presents the continuing vocational education and training (CVET) curriculum and training material developed within the framework of the Erasmus+ SeaofSkills project (‘Enriching Fishers’ Knowledge, Skills and Competences’ [contract no. 2014-1-ELO1-KA202-001658]). This work based on extensive desk research, interviews with experts on fisheries and results drawn from fishers’ field survey in selected areas within three project partners, namely, Greece, Turkey and Malta aims to provide an enhanced and updated open source training material that meets fishers’ actual needs, while upgrading their knowledge, skills and competences based on international, european and national rules and guidelines. The objective is to upgrade the training offered by enhancing the role of trainers, improving the quality of  CVET providers and providing a training material that suits fishers’ requirements.

It is important to note that the training material developed within the framework of this project will be pilot-tested in three target areas and redefined based on the outcome of an evaluation which will depict whether the SeaofSkills deliverables manage to answer fishers’ needs in training. The fishers’ training material will be provided to all relevant stakeholders through an e-learning platform reached through the SeaofSkills website: www.seaofskills.eu.

The topics covered are the following:

I- TECHNOLOGY USED IN VESSELS

  • Fishing boats and equipment
  • Equipping of boats used in SSF
  • Fish finders
  • Navigation equipment
  • Hydraulic and mechanized fishing gear

II- SAFETY AT SEA

  • Life saving appliances
  • Abandoning vessel and survival
  • Man overboard
  • First aid and fishermen health
  • Poisonous marine species
  • Vessel stability
  • Fire in the vessel and fire fighting

III- COLD CHAIN QUALITY MANAGEMENT

  • Post harvest handling
  • Processing and packaging
  • Cold storage and distribution
  • Reduce physical, Organoleptic (sensory) and nutritional losses

IV- ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO FISHERIES

  • Ecosystem principles
  • Protection of fish stock
  • Fisheries legislations
  • Marine food web and fisheries
  • Marine protected areas
  • Jellyfish blooms and other invasive species

The training material presented at this report is available as well in powerpoint presentations, found at the e-learning platform (O5-A1 intellectual output) ready to be used by trainers, who are also advised to use the Guide for Trainers (O4-A4 intellectual output) which offers a background reading, references[1] and bibliography necessary for trainers who will use the SeaofSkills training material.

Methodology

The SeaofSkills curriculum and training material developed by Ege University is based on guidelines developed by AquaTT within the framework of the project. The guidelines were broken down into three sections:

Section 1 – contained a proposed template for developing the CVET curriculum, based on a template used in previous EC-funded projects in order to ensure consistency across the courses developed by the SeaofSkills partners, synergy with other successful projects and also ensure that the developed SeaofSkills training material keeps in line with different EU policies and frameworks. This curriculum was composed of learning outcomes and guidance on how to write learning outcomes is also provided in this section.

Section 2 – provided an overview of the efforts and activities undertaken at European level to improve the quality of European VET systems and develop a common European reference framework for quality assurance in VET. In addition, this section provided an overview on the quality cycle and how to apply it, European quality assurance in vocational education and training (EQAVET) implementation, factors challenging the quality assurance and good practices in VET and how to establish quality in VET.

Section 3 – intended to provide guidance on what VET trainers’ tasks and competences are, general tips for effective teaching, communication, training material design, student’s involvement and training preparation. Furthermore, this section provided an overview of specific factors that VET teachers in the fisheries sector should take into account.

More specifically, the following guidelines on CVET Curriculum (1) and Training Material (2) were followed:

CVET Curriculum

The CVET curriculum template developed by AquaTT through a previously successful EC-funded project VALLA – Validation of All Lifelong Learning in Aquaculture. AquaTT updated the template and telephone interviews were carried out by the ‘Maria Tsakos’ Public Benefit Foundation with Greek experts in education and training to obtain further feedback.

The SeaofSkills’ CVET curriculum developed was based on the ‘learning outcome-based’ approach to education as learning outcomes play a key role in ensuring transparency of modules and programmes and of qualifications as they are clear statements of what a learner is expected to know, understand and/or be able to demonstrate after completion of a process of learning.

To successfully write learning outcomes, the following recommendations were taken into account and a list of action verbs were used:

[1] Please note that references are not provided to this report that contains the training material, since it concerns fishers and the SeaofSkills Consortium decided that references and anything related to common academic practices will be used to the material provided to trainers, namely, the Guide for Trainers (intellectual output O4-A4) that is available as well at the e-learning platform and thus, available by all stakeholders and target groups.

Recommendations:

Begin each learning outcome with an action verb, followed by the object of the verb followed by a phrase that gives the context.

Use only one verb per learning outcome.

Avoid vague terms like know, understand, learn, be familiar with, be exposed to, be acquainted with, and be aware of. These terms are associated with teaching objectives rather than learning outcomes.

Avoid complicated sentences.

Ensure that the learning outcomes of the module relate to the overall outcomes of the programme.

The learning outcomes must be observable and measurable.

Ensure that the earning outcomes are capable of being assessed.

When writing learning outcomes, bear in mind a realistic timescale within which the outcomes are to be achieved.

Bear in mind how these outcomes will be assessed. Very broad learning outcomes may be difficult to assess effectively.

Make sure the learning outcomes make sense to other people.

Try to avoid overloading the list with learning outcomes which are drawn from the bottom of Bloom’s taxonomy (e.g. Knowledge and Comprehension in the cognitive domain). Try to challenge the students to use what they have learned by including some learning outcomes drawn from the higher categories (e.g. Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation).

As far as the structure of the SeaofSkills curriculum is being concerned, it was developed based on three components:

  1. Course, which describes the study of a particular topic within a wider study area.
  2. Unit, which describes a specific part of the course.
  3. Learning outcome, which describes the final output of achievement in terms of knowledge, skills and competences.

At the course level, the following information is required:

  • Title
  • Description (brief statement describing the nature of the course and its objectives, what the candidate can expect to learn and an overview of course activities)
  • Duration (in hours and days)
  • Candidate’s profile/prerequisites (e.g. any course requirement in terms of minimum level of knowledge and skills and competences candidates should have before embarking on the course)
  • Award (e.g. number of credits)
  • Mode of delivery (e.g. face-to-face, online)
  • Provider details

At the unit level, the following information must be included:

  • Title
  • Description (statement to provide guidance on the content and context of each unit and its aims)
  • Entry level (description of the minimum level of knowledge, skills and competences candidates should have before embarking on the unit)
  • Supplementary information (any relevant information not included in previous sections such as guidance on delivery and assessment of the unit, estimated duration, etc.)

Within each unit, the following information regarding learning outcomes must be added:

  • Title
  • Knowledge, skills and competences (description of the knowledge, skills and competences that are essential for achieving the outcome)
  • Evidence requirements (statement of what candidates have to do, and to what standard, to demonstrate that they have achieved the outcome)
  • Assessment method (e.g. oral and written examinations, practice, critical incident analyses, case studies, essays, presentations, reports, continuing assessments, examinations and project work, portfolio and self- or peer reflection)

As far as the learning-outcomes approach is being concerned, the following were taken into account. Based on the work of Benjamin Bloom (Kennedy et al., 2006), three domains of learning can be distinguished:

COGNITIVE domain (knowledge)

PSYCHO-MOTOR domain (skills)

AFFECTIVE domain (attitudes)

In the different domains, Bloom distinguished successive levels arranged in a hierarchy (Figure 1). In this hierarchy, each level depends on the student’s ability to perform at the level or levels that are below it.

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Figure 1 Hierarchy of the different domain

Source: Adaptation from Kennedy et al. (2006).

Based on these levels, a list of action verbs is proposed to be used for the successful writing of learning outcomes at the different domains of learning. This list is based on the list developed by Bloom and extended by other authors over the years:

COGNITIVE domain PSYCHO-MOTOR domain AFFECTIVE domain
(knowledge) (skills) (attitudes)
analyse administer accept
apply alter act
appraise arrange adhere
argue assemble answer
arrange assemble answer
ascertain balance appreciate
assemble cooperate ask
assess deliver assist
associate design attempt
attach detect challenge
break down dismantle combine
calculate dismantle complete
categorise display conform
change dissect defend
choose drive demonstrate
clarify examine differentiate
classify execute discuss
collect fix display
combine grind dispute
compare heat embrace
compile measure follow
complete mend hold
compose mime initiate
compute mimic integrate
conclude operate join
construct organise judge
contrast perform justify
convert present listen
convince react order
create record organise
criticise refine participate
debate sketch practice
decide praise
decode question
deduce relate
deduce report
defend resolve
define share
demonstrate support
describe synthesise
design value
determine
develop
devise
differentiate
discover
discuss
divide
duplicate
employ
enumerate
establish
estimate
evaluate
examine
experiment
explain
express
extend
find
formulate
generalise
generate
grade
identify
illustrate
indicate
infer
infer
inspect
integrate
interpret
invent
investigate
judge
justify
label
list
locate
make
manage
manipulate
measure
memorise
modify
name
operate
order
organise
originate
outline
paraphrase
plan
point out
practice
predict
prepare
present
produce
propose
question
quote
rate
rearrange
recall
recognise
recollect
recommend
reconstruct
record
relate
reorganise
repeat
report
reproduce
resolve
restate
review
revise
rewrite
schedule
select
set up
show
sketch
solve
state
sub-divide
summarise
tabulate
tell
test
transfer
translate
use
validate
value

Source: Adaptation from Kennedy et al. (2006).

The following table shows some guidelines proposed by Kennedy et al. (2006) to help when writing learning outcomes.

Guidelines for writing learning outcomes

Begin each learning outcome with an action verb, followed by the object of the verb followed by a phrase that gives the context.

Use only one verb per learning outcome.

Avoid vague terms like know, understand, learn, be familiar with, be exposed to, be acquainted with, and be aware of. These terms are associated with teaching objectives rather than learning outcomes.

Avoid complicated sentences. If necessary use more one than one sentence to ensure clarity.

Ensure that the learning outcomes of the module relate to the overall outcomes of the programme.

The learning outcomes must be observable and measurable.

Ensure that the earning outcomes are capable of being assessed.

When writing learning outcomes, bear in mind the timescale within which the outcomes are to be achieved. There is always the danger that one can be over-ambitious when writing learning outcomes. Ask yourself if it is realistic to achieve the learning outcomes within the time and resources available.

As you work on writing the learning outcomes, bear the mind how these outcomes will be assessed, i.e. how will you know if the student has achieved these learning outcomes? If the learning outcomes are very broad, they may be difficult to assess effectively. If the learning outcomes are very narrow, the list of learning outcomes may be too long and detailed.

Before finalising the learning outcomes, ask your colleagues and possibly former students if the learning outcomes make sense to them.

When writing learning outcomes, for students at levels beyond first year, try to avoid overloading the list with learning outcomes which are drawn from the bottom of Bloom’s taxonomy (e.g. Knowledge and Comprehension in the cognitive domain). Try to challenge the students to use what they have learned by including some learning outcomes drawn from the higher categories (e.g. Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation).

Source: Extracted from Kennedy et al. (2006).

Training Material

As far as the training material is being concerned, it has been developed based on the following criteria taking into account the target group, namely, fishers in Turkey, Greece and Malta:

  • Develop easy to grasp short and concise training material
  • Make use of pictures
  • Provide examples
  • Encourage learner’s involvement by asking questions, discussions, etc.
  • Keep training time short
  • Provide the information in a practical way so the trainees see how to apply the learning outcomes after the training
  • Develop an easy and quick assessment system

CONCLUDING REMARKS

This report presents the curriculum and the training material for fishers developed within the framework of the Erasmus+ SeaofSkills project (‘Enriching Fishers’ Knowledge, Skills and Competences’ [contract no. 2014-1-ELO1-KA202-001658]). The training material refers to small-scale fishers who use fishing vessels under 12 meters and aims to upgrade fishers’ knowledge, skills and competences on four topics, namely a. Technology used ın vessels, b. Safety at sea, c. Cold chaın qualıty management and d. ecosystem approach to fısherıes.

Thus, the report is structured around the following axes:  a. Guidelines and methods followed within the framework of developing the curriculum and training material, b. The Curriculum and c. The training material for fishers. The aim is to increase the quality of the continuing vocational education and training provided to fishers while at the same time empowering them, through an enhanced learning material and through up-skilling and re-skilling trainers by abiding to the international and European rules and guidelines. It is important to note that the training material developed will be pilot-tested in the three target areas set within the framework of this project and will be finalised based on the outcome of the pilot-test and more specifically on the trainers’ feedback. The report of CVET curriculum and training material will be accessible through the e-learning platform for all relevant stakeholders.

Opening access to and raising adult participation in quality lifelong learning programmes lies at the heart of current EU education and training, as well as economic growth and social cohesion policies. Continuing Vocational Education and Training (CVET) is relevant to key objectives set in the context of the Europe 2020 strategy and the EU Social Investment Package for Growth and Cohesion, while is crucial to reaching the target of 15% average participation by adults (age 25-64) in lifelong learning by 2020. The fisheries sector is recognized as one of the pillars of development and is set as a cornerstone of the EU Blue Growth Strategy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. The extent of its contribution to sustainable development, economic growth and food security, however, highly depends on the knowledge, skills and competences of fishers. It is also important to place trainers at the centre of discussion through SeaofSkills, since as Cedefop has underlined “trainers have the task not only to upgrade adults’ knowledge, skills and competences required by the labour market but also to provide them with the necessary qualifications that will foster their integration into society, contribute to their personal well-being and increase the quality of their life (Cedefop, 2011)” and this is indispensable according to the SeaofSkills Consortium. Achieving the aforementioned goals was at the centre of the SeaofSkills Consortium while developing the current deliverable and the goal set is for this material to be used in real situations after the end of the project. The SeaofSkills Consortium will provide all the necessary material and tools that will facilitate this process and wishes to contribute not only to scientific discussions but also to contribute to the training of fishers.

 

The page that contains the list of abbreviations, the references and the credits for the SeaofSkills e-learning platform, can be found here.

If any technical issue arises, please feel free to contact us.

The training material developed by SeaofSkills (including all its intermediate, pilot, and final versions), is licensed by Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).